Nano BioChips From DARPA in Covid “Vaxx’s” Which Are Tracking Devices, DNA Barcoding and Branding of Humans, Etc. Creating New Artificial Molecules & Creating a New Species From Humans: GMO Patentable Humans

https://www.facebook.com/watch/live/?ref=watch_permalink&v=493799001920473

Comment: Directed Energy Weapons are used by the MILITARY. Quantum dot uses CRISPR based technology. For more on this gene editing I have a research paper link. 🙂

Page 6……………………………

Genome Editing: CRISPR-Cas9
Relatedly, genome editing technology improved. CRISPR technology
makes genome editing cheaper, faster and more efficient. CRISPRs are specialized stretches of DNA.18 The CRISPR-associated Cas-9 protein is an enzyme that acts like a pair of molecular scissors. It is capable of cutting strands
of DNA.19 It is relevant to this inquiry because it allows the cutting and replacing of parts of DNA.20 CRISPRs may serve a therapeutic purpose, in that
they may allow technologists to efficiently remove or turn off the function of
disease-causing genes and genetic mutations.21 However, transhumanists22
assert that CRISPR technology carries the potential for human enhancement.
Instead of disabling disease genes, CRISPRs could be used to modify genes
associated with undesirable traits such as aging and muscle degeneration. For
instance, the Nuffield Council on Bioethics notes in its ethical review that
CRISPR technology may be used to improve night vision or enhance an individual’s sense of smell.23
So far, CRISPR-Cas 9 has been used to make seeds for rice, potatoes and
soybeans more resistant to pests.24 It has also been used to edit the genome
of mosquitoes that carry malaria, making them unable to transmit disease.25
In 2015, researchers also used this technology to create smaller pigs with

different coat colors and patterns for use as pets.26 This technology can also
be used to create “chimera” pigs that contain the cells of both pigs and humans for the purpose of engineering organs for transplantation into human
beings.27 Policy makers, animal rights activists and others express concerns
over the use of CRISPR technology. “Some fear… that [genetically modified]
mosquitoes, once released in the wild, could behave in very unpredictable
ways.”28 Animal rights activists’ argue that it is morally wrong to use [genetically modified] pigs to give human beings new pets.29
Using CRISPR technology to edit human genomes creates the greatest
cause for concern. In April 2015, Chinese researchers “published a paper
about using CRISPR-Cas9 in an experiment involving eighty-six human embryos.”30 They aimed to find a cure for hereditary beta-thalassemia using
non-viable embryos. The scientific community responded to their paper with
concerns. Some researchers and bioethicists deemed their experiment morally unacceptable and called for an international moratorium on “any research involving the editing of human genes.”31 Others welcomed the experiment for its potential to cure disease.32 Although such use of CRISPR technology remains controversial, no moratorium exists.

https://archives.law.nccu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1044&context=siplr

Comment: Seeing Microsoft and Google and DARPA involved I have ZERO Faith this CRISPR technology will be used for the better. I am certain it will be used to Enslave All of us.

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1 Response

  1. December 14, 2021

    […] different coat colors and patterns for use as pets.26 This technology can also be used to create “chimera” pigs that contain the cells of both pigs and humans for the purpose of engineering organs for transplantation into human beings.27 Policy makers, animal rights activists and others express concerns over the use of CRISPR technology. “Some fear… that [genetically modified] mosquitoes, once released in the wild, could behave in very unpredictable ways.”28 Animal rights activists’ argue that it is morally wrong to use [genetically modified] pigs to give human beings new pets.29 Using CRISPR technology to edit human genomes creates the greatest cause for concern. In April 2015, Chinese researchers “published a paper about using CRISPR-Cas9 in an experiment involving eighty-six human embryos.”30 They aimed to find a cure for hereditary beta-thalassemia using non-viable embryos. The scientific community responded to their paper with concerns. Some researchers and bioethicists deemed their experiment morally unacceptable and called for an international moratorium on “any research involving the editing of human genes.”31 Others welcomed the experiment for its potential to cure disease.32 Although such use of CRISPR technology remains controversial, no moratorium exists.  Read More […]

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