Judaism’s Slaughter Sacrifices From Leviticus-Israel is a Rothschild Zionist Creation: See Balfour Declaration!

The primary importance of slaughtered offerings in Judaism

by TUT editor

In performing animal sacrifices the Jews learned the importance of doing religious actions with deliberate purpose

ed note–again, one simply cannot understand the underpinnings of the actions and far-reaching plans of the Jewish state and how it deals with the rest of the world, and especially its neighbors–without first understanding the deeply-embedded religious thoughts that drive the Judaic mind.

The method by which the Jews, Israelites, Hebrews, She-brews, etc–whatever word one chooses to use in describing them–interface and communicate with the violent, racist and vindictive god of Israel, yahweh is through the ‘slaughtered offering’, whereby the priest takes a goat, sheep, or bull, places his hand on the soon-to-be slaughtered animal, transfers whatever ‘sins’ are to be forgiven, then slits the animal’s throat, chops up its body and burns it on the altar of sacrifice.

No, this is not Mel Gibsons’s brilliant movie Apocalypto, it is Judaism as outlined in the Torah, specifically the book of Leviticus to wit–

‘The priest is to lay his hand on the head of the goat, ram or bull and slaughter it at the place of the burnt offering…The priest is then to take some of the victim’s blood and smear it on the horns of the altar of burnt offering and then pour out the rest of the blood at the base of the altar. He shall remove all the fat and then the priest shall burn the victim on the altar as an aroma pleasing to the LORD, and in this way the priest will make atonement for the people of Israel and they will be forgiven their sins…’

Now, for 2,000 years, ever since Titus (and his Syrian conscript troops) destroyed the Temple, there has been no daily sacrifice, which is absolutely intrinsic to Judaism. How then do the Jews satisfy the demands for blood on the part of their violent, vindictive god yahweh?

Simple–

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